Children’s Eye Exams: A Guide for Parents

Children’s Eye Exams: A Guide for Parents

Here at Dr. Miller & Dr. Tilis Family Optometry, we know that you want what’s best for your children. You want to keep your child in good health, and that includes looking after their visual health. The key to good visual health is regular eye exams, so in this article, our team will go over what you need to know about when to make an appointment for a children’s eye exam and what exactly the doctor will be looking at.

a children’s eye exam for an infant typically looks for signs of nearsightedness

•   When to Have a Children’s Eye Exam. One question many parents have is when they should take their child for their first eye exam. The answer is that your child is ready for their first exam once they reach the age of six months. Although this may seem young, six months of age is the perfect time to check on your baby’s eye development, to ensure that their eyes are working well together, and it is also a perfect opportunity to check for early signs of eye disease. Most experts, including our team here at Dr. Miller & Dr. Tilis Family Optometry, recommend that you also have your child’s eyes examined when they reach three years of age, and again before they begin school at age five or six.

•   What Tests are Involved. In addition to the eye development and movement check and disease screening mentioned above, a children’s eye exam for an infant typically looks for signs of nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), or distorted vision (astigmatism). Although signs of these problems are uncommon at this age, the examination provides an opportunity for early detection and treatment when needed. For older children, an eye exam typically includes an eye chart test (using shapes or flying E’s for those who don’t yet know the alphabet). Our team at Dr. Miller & Dr. Tilis Family Optometry will continue to check for the problems mentioned earlier, as well as test your child’s ability to focus, their colour vision, and depth perception. The doctor might use eye drops to dilate your child’s pupils in order to closely examine the retina; these drops may sting or cause blurriness, but only for a short time.

We at Dr. Miller & Dr. Tilis Family Optometry hope that this article helps you prepare for your next children’s eye exam. If you have further questions, don’t hesitate to call our team.

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